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Just finished reviewing a new digital marketing technology report (thank you Kenshoo) that further cements the notion that marketers need to stop thinking in silos. Certainly not new news, but raises the question, are you as integrated as you could be to drive results?

The research suggests that Facebook advertising has a direct, positive effect on paid search marketing performance. The research analyzed recent paid search results for a big-box retailer with more than 2,500 stores in the United States. Certain segments of the target audience were exposed to both paid search and Facebook advertising, while others were exposed to paid search alone.
Top takeaways
The study found that the paid search audience segments exposed to Facebook advertising generated 30 percent more ROI. These segments also had higher average order value (24 percent higher), better click-through rates (7 percent), and a lower cost-per acquisition (4.5 percent lower).

“The main takeaway is that having ads in market on Facebook can help you get the most bang out of your buck on search marketing campaigns,” Aaron Goldman, CMO of Kenshoo, told CMO.com. “We all know that an interplay between channels exists, and we track it in different ways. Facebook ads in partnership with search go beyond just standard attribution.”

People click on ad on Facebook and then move on to search for the products in those ads on Google, Goldman added. Google seals the deal, getting the person to transact.

Marketers have been lamenting social’s lack of ROI for a while. But now, marketers can show that social is having a direct impact on other channels–channels that are driving actual sales.

“Marketers need to track the cross-channel effect,” Goldman said. “Not just channel performance in silos. Also, think about how to apply the insights of one channel to the other. For example, a retailer can see that certain products are selling really well via search. Search is a demand signal. So if you take these products to Facebook, you get better performance.”

NetScope helps clients connect the dots across the organizational silos. Sometimes it’s easier for an outside partner to help navigate this process. Let’s talk about it! Love to hear from you.

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Thank you Sep 30th, 2013,

 

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One of the common complaints from Facebook users is the inability to find specific posts or status updates. Now, Facebook is working toward a solution by allowing posts to be found through Graph Search.

Facebook announced Monday that posts and status updates within a user’s friend network are searchable via Graph Search. This is rolling out slowly among a small group of users who have Graph Search.

Privacy settings on posts will not change, and users will not be able to see posts if they’re not within the person’s privacy controls.

Facebook announced this new feature in a Newsroom blog post:

Starting today, Graph Search will include posts and status updates. Now you will be able to search for status updates, photo captions, check-ins and comments to find things shared with you.

Search for the topics you’re interested in and see what your friends are saying, like “Dancing with the Stars” or “Posts about Dancing with the Stars by my friends.”

Facebook notes that users will soon be able to search posts by time and place, as well as look back at their own posts.

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Readers: How do you feel about these new features?

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Putting users in control of how they receive email messages is not a new concept. Consumers not only dictate which companies they get messages from, but can also manage what information they are sent and when. Gmail, however, took user control to a new level with its new, tabbed-style inbox, which automatically classifies messages into categories. Primary, Social and Promotions are default tabs that appear for users, whereas Updates and Forums sections can be included when users edit their preferences.

Like all changes that directly impact a company’s ability to attain and retain customers (think Google’s Penguin 2.0), there was much hype surrounding the recent update, from sheer panic to some announcing email marketing gone forever. The primary concerns for businesses are that their email open rates and overall engagement on that channel will suffer, as email recipients can easily ignore the Promotions tab.

Now that the dust is starting to settle, the savviest of brands are being proactive in getting users to move their emails from their “Promotions” tab (where most marketing messages end up) to their “primary” tab (essentially where, for example, an email from a friend would appear). They are also learning how to stand out in a crowded Promotions tab.

Here are practical and, more importantly, effective ways for merchants to navigate the new, tabbed-style Gmail.
1. Inform Subscribers

As Web merchants, marketers and the like, it’s easy to believe all Internet users have the same ‘Net behaviors and preferences as us. It turns out, however, there are major differences between marketers and consumers, such as 93 percent of marketers have made a purchase after receiving an email from a company, whereas only 49 percent of consumers have. This goes to show that those who are actively involved in their company’s Web success look at the ‘Net differently, meaning that despite all the excitement over Gmail’s new, tabbed-style inbox, most of your consumers may not even be aware of the change (especially if they use mobile to access email – a topic discussed in more detail below). This is where you come in.

If you haven’t already, your company should send out an email to its Gmail subscribers letting them know they need to take action. Here are two good use-cases.
Putting users in control of how they receive email messages is not a new concept. Consumers not only dictate which companies they get messages from, but can also manage what information they are sent and when. Gmail, however, took user control to a new level with its new, tabbed-style inbox, which automatically classifies messages into categories. Primary, Social and Promotions are default tabs that appear for users, whereas Updates and Forums sections can be included when users edit their preferences.

Like all changes that directly impact a company’s ability to attain and retain customers (think Google’s Penguin 2.0), there was much hype surrounding the recent update, from sheer panic to some announcing email marketing gone forever. The primary concerns for businesses are that their email open rates and overall engagement on that channel will suffer, as email recipients can easily ignore the Promotions tab.

Now that the dust is starting to settle, the savviest of brands are being proactive in getting users to move their emails from their “Promotions” tab (where most marketing messages end up) to their “primary” tab (essentially where, for example, an email from a friend would appear). They are also learning how to stand out in a crowded Promotions tab.

Here are practical and, more importantly, effective ways for merchants to navigate the new, tabbed-style Gmail.
1. Inform Subscribers

As Web merchants, marketers and the like, it’s easy to believe all Internet users have the same ‘Net behaviors and preferences as us. It turns out, however, there are major differences between marketers and consumers , such as 93 percent of marketers have made a purchase after receiving an email from a company, whereas only 49 percent of consumers have. This goes to show that those who are actively involved in their company’s Web success look at the ‘Net differently, meaning that despite all the excitement over Gmail’s new, tabbed-style inbox, most of your consumers may not even be aware of the change (especially if they use mobile to access email – a topic discussed in more detail below). This is where you come in.

If you haven’t already, your company should send out an email to its Gmail subscribers letting them know they need to take action. Here are two good use-cases.

(1) Loft sent its subscribers a step-by-step tutorial on how to permanently move its promotional emails into the primary tab.
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(2) Recipe.com added a banner ad to the top of its daily recipe email to alert users that they need to take action to see Recipe.com emails in the future.
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2. Keep Doing What You’re Doing

With Gmail’s new layout, engaged subscribers are actually more engaged. Return Path found that Gmail users who are routinely engaged with marketing email are reading emails at a slightly higher percentage with the update (roughly 60 percent, a 2.11 percent increase – see image below). Among moderately engaged recipients, the bulk of the Gmail audience, read rates dipped slightly to around 10 percent. Some industries are actually fairing much, much better. In the first week of the Tab’s release, the airline industry doubled their read rates to 34 percent.
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3. Get with the Mobile Program

Most users that open emails on their smartphones are not affected by Gmail Tabs as all emails are delivered in one inbox (e.g. for iPhone Mail, which is the number one email client for Gmail users). There are exceptions, however, for those subscribers using Gmail’s official mobile apps on Android 4.0+ devices as well as the iPhone and iPad. The same categories available for desktop Gmail users are accessible with the app. That said, nearly half of all emails are opened on mobile devices and 66 percent of Gmail opens occur on mobile devices , which may be why Tabs hasn’t had the great impact many predicted. After all, according to litmus , Gmail opens only account for about 4 percent of total email opens, and only 41 percent of those opens are occurring in email clients that support Gmail tabs.

It should be reiterated that merchants need to serve mobile-friendly emails to their customers, with Campaigner finding that 41 percent of consumers are frustrated with poor mobile design and user experience.
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4. Change Your Name (?)

With Gmails new tabbed-style format, it appears that a sender’s name carries more weight with subscribers than the email subject line, at least when a tab is not expanded. In the image below, you can see that the inactive “Promotions” tab has two new messages – one from Google Offers and the other Zagat. Merchants will want to keep their names short and clear without jeopardizing brand integrity. For example, although it would be nice if Website Magazine was recognizable by WM, thus ensuring brand recognition with just two letters, the acronym is not that familiar with our subscribers, thus, it’s better for us to keep our sender’s name as Website Magazine (a more credible source) or possibly, even better, WebsiteMagazine.com, to get as much of “Magazine” in the tab as possible. The only way we, and you will know, is to test .
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5. Be Personal, Consistent

Regardless of the effects of Gmail’s Tabs update, the fact remains that merchants must actively seek ways to activate passive users by leveraging best practices. One way to produce more opens is through sending segmented email campaigns. Retailers may see as high as 30 percent more opens using this technique rather than sending undifferentiated messages. Another email best practice that is often forgotten is ensuring consistency between emails and landing pages. It’s important to remember what will happen “after the click.” Monetate suggests maintaining a “scent trail,” where retailers use similar creative and messaging on landing pages and throughout the user experience (see example below) to increase relevance, conversions and future email engagement. A user who has a good first experience with a retailer’s email will likely want future messages from that merchant and even move their emails to his or her primary inbox.
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6. Extend Offers

With merchant offers being sent to the Promotions tab, users may in fact check that folder less often, but there is also a flip side. Shoppers may actively look for deals in their Promotions folder when they are in a purchasing mindset, which means retailers may want to consider extending their promotional offers. While it’s not reasonable to ask merchants to offer 25 percent off jeans for a back-to-school sale forever, they could include a caveat like “Kids already in school? From Sept. 13 – Oct. 1 get 10 percent off denim products to pick up those items you missed.” This makes a retailer’s message relevant longer.

Algorithm_UpdateIf your organic search metrics have been fluctuating more than usual recently, you’re in good company. Google rolled out four notable algorithm updates in the two months between May 21 and July 15, including a Panda update and the much-anticipated Penguin 2.0 update.
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Each of the updates shares a focus on improving the quality of search results by detecting and removing factors that give some sites unfair advantage over others in the rankings. This summer’s updates focus on low-quality link signals, content quality and domain advantages. In each case, Google’s intent is to combat the low-quality or spammy search results that can gum up its search results and lead to poor searcher experience.
Penguin 2.0: Next Generation Link Spam Weapon

On May 21, Google released a new version of its anti-link-spam technology, dubbed Penguin 2.0. This update has been anticipated for months, with Google warning that it would be a big one. Approximately 2.3 percent of English queries are noticeably affected by this update. That may not sound like much, but the largest reported impact to search results was 3.1 percent of queries noticeably affected with the first Penguin update in April 2012.

According to Google’s Head of Webspam Matt Cutts, the Penguin 2.0 update is more comprehensive and deeper-targeting than the previous iteration of the algorithm. Sites that have struggled with devalued link profiles since April of last year will likely have more issues with this update.

In many cases, sites that have been around for years have amassed link profiles that contain links from sites that are considered spammy today. For example, article marketing was once a popular SEO practice. However, sites began churning out low-value articles full of links just to manufacture link authority. Today the phrase article marketing makes SEOs cringe and the links built in the past through article hubs have been devalued algorithmically.

It’s important to understand two things about Penguin. First, sites aren’t technically penalized retroactively for link building practices that were legitimate in years past and are now considered dodgy. However, the value that those now-dodgy links provided is removed, so the effect is still a decreased ability to compete in search results. Second, link authority is removed automatically and algorithmically when link spam is detected. Because no manual, human penalty is applied, sites cannot submit for re-inclusion.

To recover from the effect of a Penguin update, sites need to focus on regaining the link authority they lost when those now-dodgy links were devalued. Simply manufacturing new links won’t do the trick, though, as links need to be earned naturally to have lasting value. It may also be beneficial to examine your link portfolio via Google Webmaster Tools to identify and disavow obviously spammy links.
Payday Loan Algorithm: Spammy Queries

In June, Google began targeting link spam on sites ranking for notoriously spammy queries, such as those related to payday loans, pornography, and gambling. These sites tend to have unique link schemes that violate Google’s Webmaster Guidelines. These updates will be rolling out slowly worldwide over the next couple of months. In the U.S. only 0.3 percent of queries will likely be affected. But countries like Turkey with more webspam issues are expected to see as high as 4 percent change in queries affected.

As with the Penguin 2.0 update, the key to recovering from the Payday Loan Algorithm is focusing on earning links naturally.
Partial Match Domain Update

Many ecommerce marketers are frustrated by the relative ease with which sites that purchase keyword domains compete in rankings. In September 2012, exact-match domains were devalued as a ranking signal. SEO industry blog Moz reported a 10 percent decrease in the number of exact match domains — like “www.teethwhitening.com” — that ranked in the dataset they track daily.

The partial match update takes things a step further by devaluing domains that partially match the search phrase. For instance, if the domain www.betterteethwhitening.com ranked for a search for “teeth whitening,” it would be considered a partial match domain and could see the signals sent by its keyword domain name devalued.

To be clear, the keyword domain algorithm updates don’t penalize sites with exact or partial match domains. As with Penguin where specific links lose their value, the strength of the keyword signal that the domains send is devalued in an attempt to level the playing field. This is a logical update because the presence of keywords in a domain speaks more to which sites have cash to spend on expensive domains than it does to the actual value of the site to searchers.
Panda Detuning

The most recent of Google’s updates includes a more-finely targeted Panda algorithm. Starting July 14 and rolling out over the next couple of days, this update reportedly softened or dialed back the Panda effect a bit. Originally released in February 2011, Panda’s goal was to demote low-quality sites and those with thin content.

Keeping track of Google’s algorithm updates and deciphering which may have had an impact on your site can be very challenging. The Panguin Tool is one of the easiest ways to look for correlations between your Google Analytics and the Panda, Penguin, and other Google updates. Just log in with your Google Analytics account and Panguin Tool shows your organic search visits overlaid with a timeline of algorithm updates. Moz also offers a handy list of algorithmic events with links to relevant articles describing each.

 

How B2B Decision-Makers Are Using Social Media
July 22, 2013 by MarketingCharts staff

Forrester-B2B-Decision-Maker-Use-Social-Media-July2013 Social media use is ubiquitous among B2B decision-makers in North America and Europe, according to results from a newly-released Forrester Research study. That said, their motivations for using various platforms differs greatly, and understanding those patterns is a crucial element for figuring out appropriate marketing strategies. The data suggests that among popular sites, Facebook is rarely used primarily for business purposes, while Google+ and Pinterest are still lagging in adoption rates overall.
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The survey asked respondents for what purposes they visit or participate in a list of social places. The results indicate that:

85% visit brand-agnostic communities or forums at least monthly, with 18% doing so primarily for business purposes, and another 63% for business and personal purposes;
81% visit LinkedIn with that frequency, with 26% doing so primarily for business purposes and another 48% for mixed reasons;
81% also visit Facebook at least monthly, but only 2% do so primarily for business purposes, as opposed to 42% who do so primarily for personal purposes;
80% use vendor support forums or discussion forums on vendor or brand websites (for that specific vendor or brand), with 23% doing so primarily for business reasons;
62% visit Twitter at least monthly, but only 6% do so mainly for business, as opposed to 20% mainly for personal reasons;
Google+ monthly usage stands at 49%, with primarily personal (15%) usage outweighing primarily business-related use (4%); and
32% use Pinterest at least monthly, but only 2% do so primarily for business reasons.

So what are these decision-makers doing on each of the major networks? Among LinkedIn users, 88% have connected with peers or colleagues in the past month, while 40% have participated in LinkedIn groups affiliated with a brand or vendor.

Twitter is “primarily a consumption channel,” per the researchers, with the main activity among those using it at least in some part for business reasons being reading others’ tweets (86% of users). Still, 58% have retweeted something they’ve read, 55% have posted a tweet, 54% have responded to a tweet and 42% have sought support for a product.

Finally, those using Facebook for business reasons at least part of the time most often connect with people they know (71%), but a majority have also liked a brand or vendor (57%), clicked on an ad or sponsored post (51%) and posted on a page owned by a brand or vendor (51%).

Those results suggest that B2B decision-makers use the major social media platforms for both consumption and interaction. Indeed, among all respondents, while 98% are “spectators” (reading blogs, watching peer videos, etc.), 75% are also “critics” (commenting on blogs and posting ratings and reviews) and 56% are “creators” who publish posts and upload visual media.

About the Data:The data is based on an online survey was fielded to 382 business decision-makers located in the US, Canada, France, Germany, and the UK, at SMB and enterprise companies with 100 or more employees. Business decision- makers included respondents in the IT, benefits, finance, marketing, and sales departments involved in both line-of-business product decisions and technology product decisions.

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Google wants technology to “step out of the way” as developers integrate it into everyday life. That’s per Timothy Jordan, developer advocate on Project Glass, speaking to i/o Conference attendees Thursday. It means major changes in online advertising for agencies and those developing apps and utilities, but what do brands need to know?

Executives at traditional brands are aware of the shifts in advertising, said Bob Goodman, senior vice president and director of user experience at Arnold Worldwide. “They can’t afford to ignore it,” he said. “They’re all looking for help in understanding what it means for them and how to improve on connecting with consumers.”

In Google’s world, search and paid search continue to support apps and utilities as the underlying technology, the reference design. Consumers won’t type a query, but rather indicate or imply the need for information through clicks on photos or interactions with contextual content.
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A click turns into a conversation and every page becomes a form of search, Goodman said. “You may not perceive yourself as performing a search, but rather navigating through content during your everyday life,” he said. “Marketers need to think more about the assets they can leverage to make use of content.”

Brands need to broaden their notion of the meanings of “advertising” and “media.” Technologies like Google Glass and Google Now, as well as apps like Google Maps, transition the ad industry into the era of content-driven advertising. Content in multiple forms that can move across screens with contextual relevance will become crucial to the way brands reach consumers. Google isn’t the only engine moving in this direction. Bing and Yahoo have begun to make changes too, but they have yet to become as vocal.
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That transition began when Google served the first answers to queries in the search results, rather than required searchers to click on the link that took them to a page, according to Raymond James Analyst Aaron Kessler. Ultimately, Google gets paid for sending traffic to other sites, so they will likely want to continue using that model, he said. It allows Google to move farther down the funnel to offer information similar to travel comparison sites. You can make a similar argument for other publishers, he said, pointing to Facebook’s recent Atlas acquisition to improve attribution tracking.

Krishna Subramanian, CMO at Velti, said the next generation of online advertising points to multiscreen advertising, which will lower acquisition costs for gaining new customers. “Google Glass will provide the location-based data that gets tied back into ad targeting,” he said. “People initially talked about serving coupons to a consumer standing in front of a Starbucks, but the real value will become tying together all the data to identify the daily path they travel and the frequency in which they do it.

Editors Note: How many think readers think this was the pioneer to Google Glass? Please share your comments/opinions.
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If you use TweetDeck as a dashboard for your Facebook activity, that will end Tuesday. On May 7, as promised, TweetDeck will discontinue support for Facebook feeds.

The removal of Facebook support has been planned for some time. In early March, the service publicly said it would stop supporting Facebook at the same time it abandoned its mobile apps, turning exclusively to web- and desktop-based apps. Then in late April, it gave a date: May 7.

Starting Tuesday, TweetDeck users who don’t remove their Facebook columns from their dashboards will have those columns removed for them. At the same time, TweetDeck AIR, TweetDeck for Android and TweetDeck for iPhone will all disappear from their respective app stores.
SEE ALSO: TweetDeck Update Adds Keyboard Shortcuts and More

TweetDeck’s transition from a social network aggregation tool to a service exclusively for Twitter power users is a consequence of Twitter acquiring the company in early 2011. Since then TweetDeck has shifted its focus to its web experience, desktop apps and browser extensions , leaving aggregation to other services such as HootSuite .

While it’s been known for a while that TweetDeck would scrap Facebook support, the news is catching some users by surprise, judging by discussion on Twitter:

Are you bummed that TweetDeck is sunsetting Facebook support? Share your reaction in the comments.

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If you were to invoke fairy tales in the world of social media, you might compare LinkedIn to Cinderella.

While the step-sisters Facebook and Google Plus have been preparing for the Prince’s big party, LinkedIn has been quietly going about an incredible overhaul of its system and is building up a larger and larger user base.

Many business owners and marketers are still thinking about LinkedIn as it was a year ago – a nice place to get a backlink for the business and a great place to build up one’s own personal brand.

Surprise! Things Have Changed

If you haven’t been paying attention, you’ll probably be surprised to discover it’s become a robust social media platform with many features that trump even the others.

If you’ve missed these changes you mustn’t be too hard on yourself. LinkedIn’s engineers have been as busy as the fairy godmother getting ready for the ball. Users often find that a feature that was there yesterday, like LinkedIn Answers, is gone today, and that other features have been completely changed.

If you’re in the middle of writing a book or making a training video on LinkedIn, you have my sympathy: all those screenshots need to be redone.

To keep your head above water with all of these changes, consider LinkedIn as an eco-system.

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In its easiest form, LinkedIn has four main “worlds:”

  • Personal Brand
  • Company or Organization
  • Content
  • Relationships

Personal Brand

Everything in LinkedIn revolves around the contact: you develop your own profile and connect with others. If you compare what can go into a personal profile with those of Google Plus and Facebook, you can see that LinkedIn’s is by far the most robust.

The personal profile component is where most individuals are active on LinkedIn. Several features have been enhanced, such as publications and projects, wherein you can add others that participated with you. Not only does this create a cross-connectedness of relevance, it reminds those individuals of your own existence as you add them.

Many people aren’t just adding a book they wrote, or a particular blog — but individual articles and blog posts, too. Each of these additions is another opportunity for keywords to be introduced that increase your chance of appearing in search results.

While many of us only have a handful of different jobs over decades, the projects feature allows you to add individual projects. Perhaps you worked on an e-commerce implementation for a client? You can add that project, and, like publications, include the names of other participants. When you add others, they are notified, and can allow that project to show in their own profile.

Companies Or Organizations

Companies are, of course, made up of people. As each person adds their various jobs, projects, and publications, the system creates connections with the appropriate companies along with everyone else who is connected with the organization. Companies can add services and products, various images, connect with groups, and can share updates.

When it comes to search, LinkedIn has a long way to go. Many have discovered that it isn’t difficult to apply techniques that have long been considered black hat SEO, by stuffing their profiles with keywords.

What’s the benefit to businesses? Josepf Haslam of DragonSearch recently said, “I’ve received over half-a-dozen inbound sales leads just in the past three weeks.” I, myself, have received several inquiries from journalists and conference organizers. LinkedIn also lets you know who’s been looking at your profile.

With that information in hand, you can see when and if potential or existing clients have been doing their due diligence.

If you are like many, you might still believe that LinkedIn is a place where you seek out or are found for your next career. Its human resource value is powerful, but quickly taking a back seat to the potential of a mighty social media platform connecting individuals and businesses in even more ways.

The dusty housekeeper has grown up, and is now a beautiful princess.

Opinions expressed in the article are those of the guest author and not necessarily Marketing Land.

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When the yellow pages got delivered each year we used them as weights to hold doors open (or targets for darts).   It’s not surprising that once Google and her competitors quasi-perfected their search algorithms that phone books replaced Duraflames in most homes, and “Googling” became a verb.

Now in addition to laptop “Googling” we are transfixed on searching all day long on our mobiles and tablets. Looking for a popular, highly rated Thai restaurant downtown San Francisco, turn to your Google Search app on your android. Need a new tire in a hurry, ask Siri (the underlying brain of Siri is Search) where the nearest Sears is located. And truly one of the greatest benefits of modern Search technology is  the ability to locate and select a healthcare provider whether in your local neighborhood or on vacation.

The ability to easily find and connect with a healthcare provider or doctor should be simple, right? One would hope.  Siri, “I need a podiatrist in San Francisco. As a consumer you are looking for options.  And in the shoes of the healthcare provider you want to make darn sure you are being served up by Google or Siri as a viable option for treatment and doctor visibility. Imagine being on either side of this worse case scenario: you were the only podiatrist in Irvine but lacked a website – or had a website that was not properly search engine optimized (SEO); or, you were a prospective patient but couldn’t locate a podiatrist within 50 miles of where you painfully stood. Lose lose.

Thankfully – and strategically – the healthcare industry is rapidly leveraging digital marketing solutions, especially SEO to make finding a solutions provider or individual doctor, much easier, and faster.

Below is a great article that I came across on Mashable.com that re-affirms my point that healthcare providers are getting smarter with the tactics they are taking to ensure prospective patients can find them. So if you ever need a podiatrist, ask Siri, and she’ll direct you to a doctor that not only graduated from medical school but is also proving to be pretty smart in gaining you as her next patient.

http://www.ittybittyurl.com/h5b